Sound Transit Board identifies Ballard light rail options plus a new alternative to move forward in EIS study

On May 24, Sound Transit Board of Directors gathered to review recommendations from the West Seattle and Ballard Link Extensions advisory groups and public feedback, and identified preferred alternatives and other alternatives to study in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The Board action reflects nearly 18 months of public engagement activities, including briefings to community organizations, open houses, neighborhood forums and workshops and attendance at local festivals.

Upon reviewing the Board’s motion, the following options, plus a new alternative are going to be included in the Environmental Impact Statement:

  • Movable bridge with 15th elevated station – From elevated Interbay station, continues along 15th Avenue W and crosses Salmon Bay via a movable bridge west of the existing Ballard Bridge. Continues in an elevated guideway along 15th Avenue NW. Terminates at an elevated Ballard Station on 15th Avenue NW near NW Market Street.

  • High fixed bridge with 14th elevated station – From elevated Interbay station, continues over 15th Avenue W, crosses Salmon Bay via a fixed bridge east of the existing Ballard Bridge and continues in an elevated guideway on 14th Avenue NW. Terminates at an elevated station on 14th Avenue NW at NW Market Street.
  • Tunnel with 14th or 15th tunnel station – From Interbay station, descends into a tunnel beneath Salmon Bay. Terminates at a tunnel Ballard station with station options beneath 14th Avenue NW or east of 15th Avenue NW at NW Market Street.

New Alternative from public feedback:

  • Tunnel with 20th tunnel station – Scoping comments suggested interest in a station farther west in Ballard with a tunnel crossing under Salmon Bay and tunnel station at 20th Avenue NW.

In the coming months, you can expect additional maps and information to be posted on the project website. If you’d like to stay informed on this project, we encourage you to subscribe to updates on the Sound Transit site.

Vote to fund a greenway along 6th Ave NW for Your Voice Your Choice by May 31

(Greenway Example)

…the following is from from Groundswell NW’s May Newsletter

Greenways are a key component of the 2014 Seattle Bicycle Master Plan and provide  people of all ages and abilities with safe, calm and attractive residential streets for bicycle and pedestrian travel priority. A group of Ballard neighbors supporting the 6th Avenue NW Greenway project have submitted this project to the Your Voice Your Choice program for public approval.  It involves a section of 6th Ave NW that extends from NW 43rd Street to NW 50th Street, connecting to the Burke Gilman trail at NW 43rd Street. The first phase of the two part decision process involves public “scoring” which is available online (for people 13 years and older) through the YVYC website. Please consider voting for this project at this voting link. The voting link is available from May 1 through 31 for scoring. Scoring can also be done manually and for those 11 years and older, at the Ballard Branch Library, 5614 22nd Ave NW, Seattle, WA 98107 on May 20 from 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm.

Significant potential impacts to 14th and/or 15th Ave NW by Ballard Light Rail options – provide your input by April 2

2 above-street options. Green along 15th, Brown along 14th. Both station options near Market St.

East Ballard neighbor, Brian LeBlanc attended the recent West Seattle/Ballard Light Rail options open house at the Ballard High school and put together a very helpful overview of the options under consideration, plus some insight into the possible impacts. In particular, the above street options could have a significant impact on East Ballard residents and businesses along 14th and/or 15th. Note that Brian’s blog post reflects his opinion and we are sharing in order to peak your interest and encourage you to carefully research the options yourself and provide your input by April 2 via the Sound Transit online open house.

Click here to view Brian’s post
Click here to download a PDF with visualizations of the options

Help decide how to spend $2 million on park and street improvements in Seattle

Submit ideas beginning January 28 thru February 22

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods is again engaging community members to democratically decide how to spend $2 million of the City’s budget on small-scale park and street improvements. This is the third year of Your Voice, Your Choice (YVYC): Parks & Streets.

Beginning January 28 to February 22, community members can submit an idea online at seattle.gov/yvyc or in-person at any Seattle Public Library branch. Projects could include park benches, trail improvements, flashing beacons, and curb ramps to name a few. The only criteria are the ideas be physical improvements for Seattle’s parks or streets, benefit the public, and cost $90,000 or less.

One of our neighbors, Damon May, submitted a project proposal to install a pedestrian-activated light at the intersection of 14th Ave NW and NW 53rd St. This east-west crossing would complement the signal installed at 15th Ave NW and NW 53rd to accommodate safe walking and bicycling between Central Ballard and the East Ballard neighborhood, plus provide a connection to the future north-south greenway on 6th Ave NW. You can provide your input on Damon’s proposal here:
https://nsf.consider.it/2019-218?results=true

What’s your great idea to improve streets and parks in East Ballard? If you submit an idea, please share with us and we’ll help spread the word!

Learn more about what types of projects are eligible: Idea Collection Examples.You can learn more about the YVYC process and how to get involved on the city’s webpage, and for questions, email amy.nguyen@seattle.gov.


Play Streets in East Ballard

playstreets11

This past year, Seattle Department of Transportation kicked off a pilot program to introduce Plays Streets in Seattle.

A play street closes a neighborhood street to traffic so that kids (and adults) can have more space for play and physical activity. School play streets provide additional space for recess or other special activities, like a field day. Community play streets help neighbors create more space for play during the summer or after school.

The summer has been successfully kicked off and we’ve heard that a very successful community play street along NW 58th St between 11th and 14th Ave NW has started up again this week and neighbors are inviting families in the ‘hood to join them and see what it’s like. Maybe it’ll inspire you to start up your own play street!

When: Every Thursday 5:30pm-9pm
Where: NW 58th St between 11th and 14th Ave NW
What: Come meet your neighbors, let the kids play in the street. Bicycles are welcome especially since it’s along the Greenway!

According to the Play streets map, there are a few more in the neighborhood. If you’d like us to help spread the word, please contact us!

 

Keep those Ballard Market receipts coming!

BallardWindermereOffice

The Happy Ballard Windermere Family

A big thank-you to Windermere Ballard  for saving up Ballard Market receipts for the EBCA! That big envelope of receipts you delivered to us the other day will result in a $245 donation from the Ballard Market as part of their 1% giving back to the community program!

Collecting receipts where you work is a great example of how you can make a really big impact on the East Ballard Community!  These funds will help us pay for upcoming community events, pay for watering/weeding of the median planters along 14th Ave NW and amenities for the future park.

So, keep those Ballard market receipts coming in!

Here’s how you can participate:

  1. Shop at the Ballard Market and save your receipts
  2. Drop them off at Blowing Sands Glass (5805 14th Ave NW) or at a future EBCA event, like our next Adopt A Street Cleanup on May 14 from 10AM-1PM (more details to come)

It’s that easy! Start saving today to make a difference tomorrow!

SDOT’s Neighborhood Street Fund Program – CALL FOR PROJECTS

Do you have an idea for a transportation project in your community?

  

The Neighborhood Street Fund (NSF) program pays for transportation projects identified and prioritized by the community. Projects range from crossing improvements to creating unique public spaces. Learn about past projects.

What kinds of projects can be submitted?

Projects qualify if they meet the following criteria:

  • Large, but not too large (generally between $100,000 and $1 million to design and construct)
  • Related to transportation
  • Located within SDOT right-of-way (city streets and sidewalks)
  • Have the support of their local neighborhood District Council

Projects that change the number of lanes on a roadway or propose a change to traffic control (stop signs or traffic signals) must also be evaluated by SDOT for feasibility.

How can I learn more?

Please visit our Frequently Asked Questions page for more details about the application process. SDOT staff will be attending District Council meetings in March to discuss the program. We encourage potential applicants to attend one of these meetings and to work with members of their District Council to develop their proposals. Once we confirm these and additional meetings, we’ll add them to our Upcoming Meetings page.

How are projects funded?
In November 2015, Seattle voters passed the Levy to Move Seattle. The 9-year, $930 million levy provides funding to improve safety for all travelers, maintain our streets and bridges, and invest in reliable, affordable travel options for a growing city.

The levy includes $24M to continue the Neighborhood Street Fund program over the next 9 years.  Before 2016, funds for this program came from the Bridging the Gap (BTG) transportation levy, passed by voters in November 2006.

What’s the timeline from start to finish?

The NSF program will have three 3 year cycles to select, design, and build projects.  The schedule for the first of these cycles is as follows:

February 23, 2016 Neighborhood Street Fund (NSF) call for applications
March 2016 Briefings for Neighborhood District Councils on NSF Program
April 17, 2016 Deadline for submitting NSF Proposals to SDOT
May 2016 Screening of proposals by SDOT and selection of 5 projects by each of the 13 Neighborhood District Councils for further evaluation
June – August 2016 SDOT conducts a high level design & cost estimate of the 65 projects selected by the neighborhood District Councils.
September 2016 Each Neighborhood District Council prioritizes its own list of projects.
September – October 2016 The Move Seattle Citizen Oversight Committee evaluates all proposed projects and makes funding recommendations to the Mayor & City Council.
November 2016 2017 Budget adopted
2017 SDOT designs projects
2018 SDOT builds projects

Questions?

If you have questions, additional translated material, or need help with accessing the application, please contact us at NSF@seattle.gov or 206-733-9361.