Wouldn’t a customized crosswalk be fun to have in East Ballard?

21 09 2015

Interested in applying for a Dept of Neighborhoods grant to give an existing crosswalk in East Ballard a makeover? Read below and  contact the EBCA  so we can help you get started!

Seattle Department of Neighborhoods (DON) and the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) jointly announced the Community Crosswalks program, a new way for residents to secure neighborhood oriented crosswalks. 

“This is about celebrating and enhancing community identities,” said Mayor Ed Murray. “The iconic rainbow crosswalks on Capitol Hill started a broader conversation on how we can incorporate neighborhood character in the built environment across Seattle. I’m excited to see more history, culture, and community on display for residents and visitors to enjoy.”

Spurred by the popularity of Capitol Hill’s rainbow crosswalks, which were installed in June, residents can now use the existing Neighborhood Matching Fund to request such crosswalks. This will allow unique crosswalks to be approved and installed through an established process, ensuring that they are safe, reflective of community values and can be maintained. 

“Community oriented crosswalks are great ways to represent a neighborhood,” said Kathy Nyland, director of Seattle Department of Neighborhoods. “This new crosswalk program will allow interested community members to showcase their neighborhood’s unique culture and history or just liven up an intersection with a colorful design.”

To be eligible for an installation by SDOT, applicants will need to adhere to City guidelines for crosswalk locations and designs. Crosswalks must be sited where vehicles already stop for a traffic signal or stop sign, the design should consist only of horizontal or vertical bars, and the pavement underneath must be in good condition.

“We are pleased that other Seattle neighborhoods are being inspired by Capitol Hill’s rainbow crosswalks,” said SDOT Director Scott Kubly. “Through this joint SDOT/DON effort, we can transform other crossing points into tangible signs of community pride.” 

Crosswalks typically cost about $25 per square foot, depending on the complexity of the design and installation, and can be expected to last approximately 3-5 years based on the amount of vehicular traffic at the location. More information about the program can be found here:  http://www.seattle.gov/neighborhoods/community-crosswalks. Crosswalks installed or modified outside of this process will be reviewed by SDOT and removed/repainted if determined to be unsafe.

The Neighborhood Matching Fund provides matching dollars for neighborhood improvement, organizing, or projects that are developed and implemented by community members. More information about the longstanding program can be found here:  http://www.seattle.gov/neighborhoods/neighborhood-matching-fund.

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